Rolling issue

Something is wrong with the whole idea of charging seniors who need a wheelchair $25 a month.

Something is wrong with the whole idea of charging seniors who need a wheelchair $25 a month.

Recently it came to light that this change will happen in certain areas in British Columbia as of September 1.

Since the news broke the story has caused a stir not only in Canada but also in other counties as well.

At least one MLA in British Columbia has been talking to many news groups about the fee and voicing her issues with the decision.

Canada may not have a perfect health system but it certainly is better than many other places in the world. However this type of ridiculous charge being imposed on the elderly is a travesty no matter how you attempt to justify it.

Time does not stop for anyone and we are all getting older. Though some people may not think $25 is  a lot of money, for people who are on fixed incomes, it alters their lives.

The fact that these groups are now going to take advantage of the situation is shocking. Perhaps I am wrong but it seems like seniors in the province have just received a rather stinging slap in the face.

It has been said that no senior will go without a wheelchair if they need one and cannot afford it. But to get one that way you have to prove you can not make the payment through a hardship waiver.

This seems to be a degrading thing to do to seniors.

At what point did we loose all respect for the older generation.

There has to be a time when we all sit back and say enough is enough. The older generations are part of what makes Canada great. They hold on to the history of our country and helped build what we have today.

The idea of charging people in this way is a mind numbing reminder to just how far respect has been lost for these people.

Money rules all else and it is silly to try and justify this as a maintenance cost.

These people, who live in elderly long-term care facilities as patients, already have to pay a substantial amount of the money they receive to live at the facilities.

It is not easy getting older for many people. We all think back to what we used to be able to do and realize that time certainly changes who we are physically and mentally.

This is a hard thing to accept. But now it is as if there is an added punishment we receive when our body starts to break down.

The fact is once one area makes this move it will not take long before the idea spreads to more areas in the province.

That is the way making money works. This is one of those times when decency should make people who get to make decisions sit back and rethink what they are doing if for no other reason than one day they may be in the situation where they need a wheelchair and the price may just be out of their reach.

 

Just Posted

Your weekly Mountain Minute

This week’s top stories… Continue reading

Highway 1 closed to due fatal accident east of Revelstoke

A dump truck lost control and the driver was ejected

Stetski talks up NDP election platform

NDP candidate for Kootenay-Columbia riding outlines election ‘commitments’ to Canadian voters

UPDATE: Boat sinks in less than a minute on Mitten Lake

A Saturday afternoon at Mitten Lake quickly turned sour for a local… Continue reading

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

Highway 1 closed near Revelstoke

No estimated time for opening

RCMP investigate two shootings in the Lower Mainland

Incidents happened in Surrey, with a victim being treated at Langley Memorial Hospital

CRA program to help poor file taxes yields noticeable bump in people helped

Extra money allows volunteer-driven clinics to operate year-round

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Most Read