Lock up your stuff!

Almost every week I hear stories, or read in the RCMP Report, that property has been stolen in Golden.

I have only been stolen from once in my life, and as much as I hate to admit it, it was mostly my own fault.

When I was in high school I had a combination lock on my locker. In the ninth grade I realized that I could push my lock so that it looked like it was closed.

I was excited by this revelation. It saved me precious seconds every day, not having to enter the combination (which often took me two or three times to get right).

So basically, I stopped locking my locker.

I came back from class one day in the tenth grade to find my stuff all over the hallway floor. Someone had noticed my lock wasn’t completely shut and decided to go rummaging through my locker.

Whoever it was made away with a winter coat, and a very expensive calculator.

I was furious, cursing this unknown person for having the audacity to take my things. My friends just looked at me with an unsympathetic expression on their faces. I knew what they were thinking.

“That’s why you lock your locker silly girl.”

When I went home that evening I didn’t get any  sympathy from my parents either. All they said was:

“So how are you going to buy yourself a new calculator?”

I was angry at the still unknown thief, but equally angry at myself.

It is never OK to steal someone else’s things, and nobody deserves to be stolen from. But we all have the power to prevent many of the thefts that occur by simply locking up our belongings.

Almost every week I hear stories, or read in the RCMP Report, that property has been stolen in Golden. Possessions from unlocked cars or homes are constantly being taken.

I heard one story of a purse being stolen when it was laying on the front seat of the owner’s unlocked vehicle.

The most common crime of this sort seems to be the liberation of other people’s bikes. Every week the RCMP are tracking down bicycles that went missing, usually the night before.

Houses on common routes home from the bars tend to be hit the hardest, as inebriated residents grab the first bike they see to get themselves home faster.

According to a report from RCMP Staff Sergeant Troy Durand, crime in Golden is down from the previous year across the board.

If we all put in a little bit of effort, and make it as difficult as possible for criminals to get their hands on the goods, I think we’ll see it go down even further next year.