Anthropocene, the Human Epoch will be one of the films shown during the series. It was well received at TIFF and is available on Netflix. (Photo courtesy of Anthropocene film)

Anthropocene, the Human Epoch will be one of the films shown during the series. It was well received at TIFF and is available on Netflix. (Photo courtesy of Anthropocene film)

Wildsight Golden brings in new film series

The films were all chosen with the unifying theme of water

Wildsight Golden is partnering with the Golden Regional Youth Action Group to bring a series of films to the big screen at the Youth Centre.

The series, which started on Feb. 13, will run for the rest of February and into March, as a way for people to escape the cold winter months.

“In the winter people tend to snuggle down and watch films,” said Leslie Adams, the community outreach coordinator for Wildsight Golden. “Since I’ve been in Golden, people have always put on film series, but there weren’t as many this year, so I decided to try this out. We wanted to offer it to the community in the doldrums of winter as an escape.”

There will be a total five films shown, with screenings of Patagonia Films’ Artifishal on Feb. 13, Anthropocene, the Human Epoch on Feb. 20, The Reckoning: A Film about the Effects of the Columbia River Treaty on Feb. 27 and Watermark: the History and Use of Water being shown on March 5.

The first film is about people, rivers and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them.

Anthropocene documents the impact humans have made on the planet across the globe. While Adams acknowledges that the film has some negative parts, overall she finds that it’s a film that is hopeful for the future of the planet.

The Reckoning is a film about the effects of the Columbia River Treaty and hits some key points that are close to home for Golden.

The final film, Watermark, is about the use and the history of water.

The films were chosen with the unifying theme of water, which Adams says is critical to discuss in our modern age of climate change. The films were all chosen in consultation with a group of volunteers, as well as based on availability.

“It’s critical to understand the importance of water and the importance of preserving the environment, especially when it pertains to water,” said Adams. “Our society is impacted so much by water and in this country we’re so fortunate to have so much of it and all the resources that are associated with water.”

Following the films, there will be an opportunity for discussion.

The cost of entry is free, although Wildsight will be accepting donations for those who wish to contribute. Snacks will be provided.


Claire Palmer
Editor for the Golden Star
Email me at claire.palmer@thegoldenstar.net
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