VIDEO: Aerial tour of flooding in Williams Lake area

Eleven properties in the Industrial Park are on evacuation order. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photos - Williams Lake Tribuen)
A fuller view of the lagoons.
A home along South Lakeside where water has come up higher than normal this week.
More South Lakeside homes impacted by high water levels in the Williams Lake.
A house on the point on the south side where water has not entered from the lake, however, the owner confirmed Monday the water has come into the basement from beneath the house from the water table. They had water pumps going when the Tribune visited the home Monday.
A gazebo normally set on the beach at another lakeside home down in Russet Bluff is in the water.
A home and property on Pigeon Road in 150 Mile House that was evacuated due to flooding from nearby Borland Creek.
High river flows continue to erode the river valley and compromise the City’s sewage treatment infrastructure. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photos - Williams Lake Tribune)
The Onward gravel pit where Peterson Contracting is creating materials for ongoing flood repair. Some of the trucks picking up materials from the site are City of Williams Lake’s. The Onward gravel pit where Peterson Contracting is creating materials for ongoing flood repair. Some of the trucks picking up materials from the site are City of Williams Lake’s.
Another view of the road going through the 150 Mile Ranch.
City councillor Scott Nelson checks out the damage first hand.
The river continues to undermine the infrastructure protecting the sewage lagoons.
A road from one side of the lagoons to the other is completely washed out as you can see in the centre.
The bank against the river was once the edge of the road where you can see City crews standing.
Another angle showing the ongoing erosion.

On Tuesday morning Black Press Media was invited to tour by helicopter some of the places that have flooded in the Williams Lake area.

Departing from behind the Williams Lake Stockyards with pilot Wayne Peterson of Peterson Contracting, we flew over the industrial area, past Scout Island, headed east over Williams Lake past Sugar Cane, above 150 Mile House and then touched down at Peterson’s Onward Gravel Pit.

It is there that new materials are being made to help with bridge and road repair as well as to help mitigate ongoing erosion of creeks and river banks throughout the region, including the Williams Lake river valley.

From the gravel pit we flew back into Williams Lake where we could see several homes on either side impacted by the high level of the lake.

Peterson pointed out where the aggregate is being brought from the Onward pit to a staging area at Tolko Industries in the log yard behind Lakeview that is then hauled to the river valley along a road leading from the log yard high above the south side of the valley.

Crews are also working to repair that upper road.

Flying over the river valley is sobering. We went all the way to the Fraser River and back again.

It is something to see how much damage has incurred.

So much of the area has become a flood plane and you can witness erosion by the minute.

Bridges are gone, parts of the road in the valley are gone, pipes are severed and the sewer outflow pipe is exposed but intact.

Peterson’s father, Earl Peterson, built the original Frizzi Road into the valley in the 60s. He owned land on top of Moore Mountain, of which Peterson still owns 40 acres today.

Wayne remembers a big flood in 1965 that was similar to what we are seeing now.

“On Friday we were eight inches away from that so that means in the last 50 years we’ve had two one-in-two hundred year floods,” Peterson said.

Read more: State of emergency declared in Williams Lake due to flooding, erosion in River Valley

Read more: Williams Lake River Valley system still compromised, crews will attempt to access sewer lagoons Tuesday



news@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

flooding

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

WildSafe Golden returns for 2020 season

Programming will be offered online and in compliance with health authorities recommendations

Golden’s Kicking Horse Gymnastics Club goes virtual during COVID-19

Head coach Hailey Boustead has spent hours putting together online classes for her athletes at home.

Tourism Golden re-launches “Locals Lowdown” campaign

The campaign seeks to give a face and personality to Golden to encourage tourism.

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Golden police seek Good Samaritan after house fire

An unidentified individual may have saved lives in the early-morning fire.

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

B.C. Paralympian named to Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame

Three-time world and Paralympic gold medalist Sonja Gaudet is part of 11-member class

Restorative pole project underway in Edgewood

The pole was made almost 50 years ago to pay respect to local First Nations

Most Read