There’s still plenty of sun to be had before fall hits, according to Environment Canada, as temperatures are forecast to hit close to 30 Celsius once again this weekend. (Claire Palmer photo)

There’s still plenty of sun to be had before fall hits, according to Environment Canada, as temperatures are forecast to hit close to 30 Celsius once again this weekend. (Claire Palmer photo)

Temperatures soar ahead of fall in Golden

However, both the Farmer’s Almanac and Environment Canada are calling for a snowy winter

Golden can expect another blast of summer over the weekend, with temperatures forecasted to hit around 30 Celsius as another heat wave hits B.C.

After the weekend, temperatures are supposed to dip back down to the mid to low 20s, with rain in the forecast for early next week.

At night, temperatures will dip down to the low teens, a sign that fall is around the corner.

Smoke in the area is expected to continue to persist on and off as wildfire season rages on, with conditions changing rapidly based on wind and fires in the area.

The Environment Canada probabilistic forecast for the next one to three months shows that Golden has about a 40 to 50 per cent chance of temperatures being above normal heading into fall, with a slight chance of near normal temperatures.

Across the province, temperatures are forecasted to be above normal, as the current trend of heat continues well into October, according to forecast.

The seasonal forecasts produced by Environment Canada are based on an ensemble of 20 predictions.

While summer is still holding on as long as it can in B.C., many are looking forward to the winter ahead, with the Farmer’s Almanac released their long-term forecast for the 2021-22 winter.

The Almanac is calling for a typical winter in terms of temperatures and precipitation in B.C.

The Almanac says that the winter may start off mild and wet, but will turn storm and white as winter perseveres.

According to the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac, snow will fall this winter but at a near-normal, average amount from coast to coast.

However, there will be notable month month-to-month flip-flops that could bring heavy snowfall.

The Almanac bases their long-range weather forecasts on three scientific disciplines: solar science, which is the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, which is the study of prevailling weather patterns; and meteorology, which is the study of the atmosphere.

Traditionally, people who follow the forecasts closely say their accuracy runs in the neighborhood of 75 to 80 per cent, according to the Almanac website. The Environment Canada echoes the forecast, predicting that winter will look slightly mild in the Kootenays, but with a chance of above normal precipitation through March.

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