The study looked at 11 areas of policy implementation areas to assess how well provinces and territories reduced harm (File photo)

Study: B.C.’s regulation of alcohol second-best in the country but still failing

University of Victoria finds alcohol regulation in B.C. to be poor but still second best in Canada

Researchers examining risk mitigation in provincial and territorial alcohol regulations have given B.C. a failing grade.

Yet earning the D-minus is enough to put the province in second place, behind Ontario, for its harm minimization policies in the country.

The study, published by the University of Victoria’s Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, based its grades on policies to “reduce the harms and economic costs from alcohol use.”

ALSO READ: More government liquor stores may sell cold beer and wine

When compared to the “gold standard best practice” in alcohol policies, B.C. scored poorly, earning Fs in nearly half the categories identified, including pricing and taxation. The institute recommends the province raise the price of alcohol annually to keep in line with inflation and to prohibit discounts on pitchers based on volume.

Other policy recommendations include raising the minimum legal drinking age, developing screening and referral guidelines for healthcare settings (both in person and online) and mandatory pre-screening of all alcohol ads. Another suggestion asks to get rid of “ferment-on-premise outlets” which it says encourages bulk sales of inexpensive alcohol.”

ALSO READ: Liquor review finds issues with B.C. wholesale monopoly

“There are serious risks to our public health and safety from the new tendency to treat alcohol as an ordinary commodity like milk or orange juice,” said the project lead and CISUR director Dr. Tim Stockwell in a release.

Ontario had the best score with a solid D grade, although signs for the province may be pointing downward.

“From the view of health and safety, the ugliest developments can be found in Ontario, where minimum prices have been slashed and free alcohol in casinos can now be publicly advertised, among several other backward steps.”

ALSO READ: B.C. gets another taste of liquor reform

swikar.oli@goldstreamgazette.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Kicking Horse conditions update

Kicking horse has reported 1 cm of snow in the past 24… Continue reading

Friday Highway update

Drive BC has issues a warning to watch for slippery sections of… Continue reading

Proposed refreshed look for Downtown plaza

The downtown plaza outside of the post office may be getting a… Continue reading

Kootenay-Columbia MP talks throne speech, USMCA trade deal

Rob Morrison to open constituency office in Cranbrook at 800C Baker St. on Dec. 19

Kootenay-Columbia MP reacts to leader’s surprise resignation

The resignation of Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer caught members of his caucus by surprise

VIDEO: More air-passenger rights go into effect this weekend

The first set of passenger rights arrived in mid-July in Canada

Swoop airlines adds three destinations in 2020 – Victoria, Kamloops, San Diego

Low-fair subsidiary of WestJet Airlines brings new destinations in April 2020

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Transportation Safety Board finishes work at B.C. plane crash site, investigation continues

Transport Canada provides information bulletin, family of victim releases statement

Trudeau sets 2025 deadline to remove B.C. fish farms

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Wagon wheels can now be any size! B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Indigenous mother wins $20,000 racial discrimination case against Vancouver police

Vancouver Police Board ordered to pay $20,000 and create Indigenous-sensitivity training

Sentencing for B.C. father who murdered two young daughters starts Monday

The bodies of Aubrey, 4, and Chloe, 6, were found in Oak Bay father’s apartment Dec. 25, 2017

Most Read