The heat wave is expected to continue over the next week. A heat warning remains in place. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

The heat wave is expected to continue over the next week. A heat warning remains in place. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Daily high temperatures records topple in Golden over the weekend

Golden saw new all time highs for June 26 and 27, beating records from 1925 and 2016

Sunday in Golden saw a high of 36.7, setting a new daily high record for June 27 since Environment Canada started tracking data in 1902. The previous record was 36, set in 2016.

Saturday also saw a single day record set with a high of 33.9, beating out a high of 33.3 from 1925.

Single day records are expected to continue to fall, as temperatures are expected to continue to remain in the mid to high 30s throughout the week. A slight drop in the heat is expected ahead of the long weekend.

Golden has already surpassed the hottest day of the year from last year, where temperatures hit 33.9 twice at the end of July as a part of a heat wave over the August long weekend.

Average highs for this time of year are typically in the low to mid 20s.

The hottest temperature ever recorded in Golden is 40 degrees, according to Environment Canada. Temperatures will get close over the next week as the heat wave continues.

READ MORE: Heat warning issued for Golden as temperatures continue to rise

Over the weekend, Lytton B.C. set the record for hottest temperature ever recorded in Canada, registering a daily high of 46.1 degress on Sunday, according to Environment Canada. They are also the first place in the country to record a temperature above 45 degrees.

A heat warning remains in effect for the area as an exceptionally strong ridge of high pressure is situated over British Columbia. The duration of the heat wave is of concern as there is little relief at night, with elevated lows at night.

This record-breaking heat event will increase the potential for heat-related illnesses and increase the risk of wildfires due to drought conditions.

Environment Canada and Interior Health are encouraging people to drink plenty of water, even before you feel thirsty and to stay in a cool place.

Check in on older family, friends and neighbours. Never leave people or pets inside parked vehicles.

Watch for the symptoms of heat illness: dizziness/fainting; nausea/vomiting; rapid breathing and heartbeat; extreme thirst; decreased urination with unusually dark urine.

Outdoor workers should take regularly scheduled breaks in a cool place.

Heat wave