Clovechok on Throne Speech

The shine is coming off the penny, says MLA Doug Clovechok after listening to Tuesday’s Throne Speech from the provincial NDP government.

“The honeymoon period for this government is over and it wasn’t a great honeymoon.”

Clovechok said he sat in the Legislature on Tuesday afternoon for 50 minutes “completely underwhelmed” at what was being offered.

“It was heavy on spending but nothing on the revenue side,” Clovechok said. “Throne speeches are usually a precursor to the budget and if that’s the case, God help us.”

Clovechok said he hopes British Columbians picked up on the NDP walking away from campaign promises during the speech.

“$10 a day child care? Broken promise. They promised $855 million over three years for $10 child care. The federal government has come up with $150 million. That means the province has to come up with $700 million. No mention of how they will do that. They’re saying $10 a day was more of a slogan and now they’re spreading it out over ten years.

“Housing, a $400 rental rebate was talked about. Nothing on that. It’s nothing but broken promises and people will remember that.”

Clovechok also was unimpressed with the very little mention of the issues around the Kinder Morgan pipeline.

“It’s clear they can’t offend Andrew Weaver. The pipeline was approved by the federal government and went through five stringent conditions. This is pandering to the three Green MLAs.”

On a positive note, Clovechok said figuring out how to tax Air BnBs and other short term renters was a good thing, although he noted it was first brought up by the BC Liberals.

“As for the 50 per cent MSP reduction, it was our idea and they said it would be eliminated completely.”

However, Clovechok says his biggest concern is always Columbia River Revelstoke and he was greatly disappointed in the lack of anything that indicates concern about rural ridings.

“There was nothing on the Trans Canada Highway. People are dying on that highway between Golden and Three Valley Gap every week. They talk about the Pattullo Bridge and congestion in Surrey. They are focused on the needs of urban BC. Nothing about wildlife management except for a bit more money for the CO service. Nothing on tourism.”

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