In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, center, is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, left, looks on, after the verdicts were read at Chauvin’s trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Court TV via AP, Pool

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, center, is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, left, looks on, after the verdicts were read at Chauvin’s trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Court TV via AP, Pool

Canadians view Derek Chauvin guilty verdict in George Floyd death as good news: poll

Ninety-three per cent of respondents said police officers wearing a body camera is a good measure

A new survey suggests a vast majority of Canadians believe the verdict that found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of the murder of George Floyd was good news.

A jury found Chauvin guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter after he knelt on Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes last year.

The survey by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies shows 84 per cent of Canadian respondents reported being satisfied with the court decision.

Leger executive vice-president Christian Bourque said Canadians seem to be optimistic that the verdict will have a positive impact on how policing is done is Canada.

“The data clearly show just how positive Canadians feel about the Derek Chauvin verdict last week, and how they believe it will have an impact on the way police forces actually do their work in the future,” Bourque said.

Seventy-two per cent of respondents say the verdict will help in ensuring police forces are held accountable for their actions in the future, while 15 per cent say the verdict won’t have an impact and five per cent say it will have negative impact, making police officers less accountable.

Bourque said more than half of the respondents say the verdict will create a change of the culture within police forces.

The online poll of 1,548 adult Canadians was conducted April 23 to 25, and the survey cannot be assigned a margin of error because web polls are not considered random samples.

The survey also shows that 68 per cent of respondents believe this guilty verdict will have a positive impact on the training of police officers in general and 38 per cent believe it will help in reducing racial tensions in Canada.

“Where (Canadians) do feel that there is still a lot of work to do is to what extent the Derek Chauvin verdict will have an impact on improving racial tensions in the country,” Bourque said.

“That’s where Canadians are more divided, and probably feel it takes more than that to actually have a positive impact on racial tensions in their communities and in the country.”

The survey also suggests that a vast majority of Canadians support implementing measures to improve police officers’ relations with visible minorities in Canada.

Ninety-three per cent of respondents said police officers wearing a body camera is a good measure, and only three per cent said it’s a bad one.

Eighty-five per cent say police departments should increase training hours for police officers on relations with visible minorities.

Also, 80 per cent of respondents say police officers should be equipped with non-lethal weapons such as taser guns, cayenne pepper sprays or concussion grenades, besides their usual firearm.

On prioritizing the hiring of police offers from visible minorities, 60 per cent of respondents say they see that as a good measure while 19 per cent see it as a bad measure.

The survey included questions about the work every level of government is doing to reduce racial tensions and improve relations with Canada’s visible minorities.

Fifty-six per cent of respondents say they are satisfied with the work Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is doing to improve relations with visible minorities, while 52 per cent are satisfied with their provincial government’s work and 56 per cent are satisfied with their local government’s work.

“We probably would have expected a higher (number) for Justin Trudeau on this question, compared to how people view their provincial government, for example, or their municipality,” Bourque said.

“Because, really, it’s at the centre of who he is, and what he wanted to be as a leader.”

——

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Maan Alhmidi, The Canadian Press

USA

Just Posted

Students at Creston Valley Secondary School put together an art installation of a replica residential school room. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Creston students create art installation of residential school room

The replica was decorated with a small bed, school uniform, and notes written with pleas for help

An example of the kinds of invasive plants that can be found in Golden. (Tesia Hackett photo)
Golden annual weedpull back for 14th year

Invasive plants can be harmful to local ecosystems, Wildsight says

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Second dose vaccinations accelerating throughout region: Interior Health

To date, more than 675,000 doses have been administered throughout the region

BC CDC map showing the geographic distribution of cases in the province. (BC CDC photo)
No new cases of COVID-19 in Golden

The last time the BC CDC reported a new case in the area was the week of May 23-29

Prince Charles Secondary School
School District 8 votes in favour of name change for Secondary School in Creston

In an act of reconciliation, a new name will be chosen for Prince Charles Secondary School

Bear wanders Kelowna on June 15. (Michelle Wallace/Facebook)
Bear climbs fence, uses crosswalk in Kelowna

The bear was spotted on Baron Road Wednesday evening

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

201 First Street West 1980s. Prior revitalization. (Photo from Revelstoke Museum and Archives)
Man who redesigned downtown Revelstoke honoured with lifetime achievement award

Robert Inwood has worked on historical projects across the province

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

The weekly COVID-19 map for June 6 to 12. (BC CDC)
South Okanagan sees only 5 new cases in last week

The Similkameen Valley went a second week without any new cases

A heart of ribbons is seen on the fence of Highroad Academy along Chilliwack Central Road on Friday, June 4, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Orange Heart Memorial campaign launches in Vernon on National Indigenous Peoples Day

North Okanagan Friendship Center raising funds for bench, mural memorializing 215 discovered in Kamloops

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

Most Read