BC Ferries appoints new president

BC Ferries' board of directors has appointed senior executive Michael Corrigan to replace outgoing CEO David Hahn.

Coastal-class ferries docked at Swartz Bay. New BC Ferries president Michael Corrigan was responsible for the new vessel program and terminal upgrades.

VICTORIA – BC Ferries’ board of directors has appointed senior executive Michael Corrigan to replace outgoing CEO David Hahn, who is leaving at the end of the year.

Corrigan’s salary will be $563,000, if he reaches all the performance and safety bonus targets in his contract. Along with three other senior executives, Corrigan is being paid a lump sum of $200,000 to compensate for the cancellation of BC Ferries’ long-term bonus program.

BC Ferries board chair Donald Hayes said Corrigan’s total compensation will be about 60 per cent of that paid to Hahn, who announced his early retirement in September as part of a cost-cutting program at the Crown corporation. Hahn’s compensation topped $1 million in the last two years, making him the highest-paid public servant in B.C.

Hayes said Corrigan’s former position of chief operating officer is being eliminated, saving BC Ferries about $600,000 a year.

Corrigan joined BC Ferries in 2003 as vice president for business development, where he was responsible for new vessel construction and terminal upgrades.

Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom said Corrigan’s new salary is within the range of legislation passed by the government this spring amid controversy over Hahn’s salary. Speaking to reporters in Vancouver Tuesday, Lekstrom said he expects there will still be complaints about the pay, which is more than the new CEO of BC Hydro makes.

But the board makes the decision, and legislation passed in 2003 to take the political interference out of BC Ferries operation prevents cabinet ministers from getting involved.

Lekstrom said he is expecting B.C. Ferry Commissioner Gord Macatee’s report on ferry rates to be released soon. Macatee is reviewing the mandate imposed in 2003 to move towards a user-pay ferry system and not allow the profitable large runs to subsidize the smaller routes.

“The biggest question I get is the affordability issue, and Mr. Corrigan recognizes that, and he is going to do, in the discussion I had with him, everything he can to work collaboratively and ensure we have an affordable system,” Lekstrom said.

Listen to audio of Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom’s comments:

Just Posted

Schools placed in ‘hold and secure’ following RCMP incident

An incident in the community cause all three local schools to be… Continue reading

EDITORIAL: Gillette ad challenges men

Recently, Gillette changed their logo and put out a two-minute ad, all… Continue reading

Bear’s Paw Heights sparks public commentary

A public hearing for rezoning at Bear’s Paw Heights, on Selkirk Hill,… Continue reading

Nourish: One appointment can have lasting effects

By Sarah Wegelin “If we want to heal, we have to make… Continue reading

Rockets defeat Rebels and Thundercats

The Golden Rockets took on the Castlegar Rebels January 11 on home… Continue reading

Students seen mocking Native Americans could face expulsion

One 11-minute video of the confrontation shows the Haka dance and students loudly chanting

May plans next move in Brexit fight as chances rise of delay

Some say a lack of action could trigger a ‘public tsunami’

Group challenges ruling for doctors to give referrals for services that clash with beliefs

A group of five Canadian doctors and three professional organizations is appealing

Major winter storm wreaks havoc on U.S. travel

Nearly 5,000 flights were cancelled Sunday around the country

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Most Read