Finance Minister Mike de Jong and Premier Christy Clark take questions on their new foreign buyer tax Monday

B.C. imposes foreign buyer tax on Metro real estate

New 15% tax imposed on non-Canadian buyers in Metro Vancouver, proceeds to a new housing fund

The B.C. government is imposing a new 15 per cent tax on property purchased in Metro Vancouver by non-Canadian citizens or residents.

The tax is to take effect Aug. 2, Finance Minister Mike de Jong told the B.C. legislature Monday at a special session called to deal with the spiralling cost of real estate in parts of urban B.C. The tax does not extend to municipalities outside Metro Vancouver, but could be amended to include those later.

De Jong said revenue from the tax will go into a new provincial fund to provide rental and social housing. Some revenues from a recent increase in B.C.’s property transfer tax on high-end homes may also be directed to the “housing priority initiatives fund,” which is being started up with $75 million in seed money from the provincial treasury.

The new 15 per cent rate on the property transfer tax will be imposed on purchases by foreign nationals and foreign controlled corporations, intended to discourage investment by non-residents.

MORE: Pundits split on whether foreign buyer tax will cool market

In the budget in February, de Jong increased the property transfer tax to three per cent on value of homes more than $2 million, and raised the exemption level to $750,000 for the purchase of new homes, in an effort to encourage new supply.

The property transfer tax continues to apply at one per cent on the first $200,000 of resold homes, and two per cent on value between $200,000 and $2 million. It has produced a windfall of revenues to the province in a hot real estate market in southern urban areas.

Premier Christy Clark said there will be more details in the coming months on how the province will use the new housing fund. She said the 15 per cent foreign buyer tax was chosen after examining similar taxes in Singapore, Hong Kong, London and Sydney.

“There is evidence now that suggests that very wealthy foreign buyers have raised the overall price of housing for British Columbia,” Clark said. “And if we are going to put British Columbians first, and that is what we are intending to do, we need to make sure that we do everything we can to try to keep housing affordable, and to try and make sure those very wealthy foreign buyers find it a little bit harder to buy a house in the Greater Vancouver area.”

NDP leader John Horgan said the province needs to use income tax data to determine whether home buyers are paying tax in Canada, rather than impose rules on foreign nationals.

“Much of the investment that’s happening now in the Lower Mainland is being directed by cash from somewhere else, by people who are already here,” Horgan said.

NDP housing critic David Eby said a foreign investor could avoid the tax by setting up a Canadian company to buy real estate.

The housing legislation introduced Monday also imposes new regulation on the B.C. real estate industry, replacing self-regulation with a new Real Estate Council appointed by the provincial cabinet.

 

Just Posted

CP vote deadline rescheduled for Friday

The deadline for the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference and International Brotherhood of… Continue reading

New Visitor Centre offers many amenities

Tourism Golden launched its offical opening before the start of May long weekend

Residents can expect flooding in residential areas

Those hit by flooding in the past can expect similar water levels in their basements again

Firefighters climb tallest tower for charity

Three local firefighters participated in the Firefighter Stairclimb Challenge, racing their way… Continue reading

CSRD challenged to create equitable partnership with Golden

Submitted by Karen Cathcart Since August 2016, the Town of Golden and… Continue reading

Vancouver Island girl scores with winning song for BC Summer Games

‘Colours’ is a perfect theme for 2018 BC Summer Games

Feds limit chinook fishery to help killer whale recovery

Chinook is main food source for only 76 southern residents killer whales left

B.C. mom who died just before daughter’s wedding wanted family to be happy: twin

Ann Wittenberg was pulled into the ocean while on a surf board in Tofino last weekend

Courtenay-Alberni MP calls for lifeguards at popular surf spot near Tofino

The Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is defending its decision to cancel the surf guard program.

Harvey Weinstein to surrender in sex misconduct probe: officials

Would be first criminal charge against Weinstein since scores of women came forward

Second commercial acid spill in Kootenay city

Station 374 Trail was called to a Hazmat scene Wednesday night on Highway 3B

Kootenay village pot survey reveals a mixed bag

The majority of Warfield respondents were for cannabis sales, but with dispensary restrictions

Media are not an arm of the police, Vice lawyer tells Supreme Court hearing

Ben Makuch challenges Ontario Court of Appeal ruling that he must give materials for stories to RCMP

B.C. launches plan to tackle doctor shortage, emergency room congestion

John Horgan aims to set up regional primary care networks in a ‘team-based’ approach

Most Read