An aggressive peacock has been put into ‘solitary confinement’ after wreaking havoc on the front entranceway of a Douglas Street apartment building. The bird is safe, says Victoria Animal Control Services, but will be held there for some time. (Courtesy of Susan Simmons)

Aggressive peacock removed from Victoria building entrance after attacking resident

Peacock used entranceway as mating ground for months

A bold and boisterous peacock was removed from the entranceway of a Victoria apartment building after bullying residents and delivery people.

Resident Susan Simmons, known in the community for leading marathon swimming group The Spirit Orcas, says the peacock, who she has dubbed simply, ‘Pea,’ took up residence outside the building in mid-March.

Located in the 200-block of Douglas Street, the building is a short strut from the home base of the city’s peafowl, which typically live amongst the foliage of Beacon Hill Park.

But not this peacock.

“He just kind of perched on our fence that follows the pathway,” Simmons said. “He would stand in front of the doors to the building, do his mating dance and attract peahens.”

READ ALSO: B.C. city approves plan to relocate 100 peacocks

The noisy bird moved in just after the COVID-19 pandemic was declared, forcing those stuck at home or in Zoom meetings to endure his noisy, incessant calls.

“Every time a large vehicle came by he would get mad and call out. He kind of silenced the community by being really loud himself,” Simmons said with a laugh.

But the noise was only half the problem. ‘Pea’ became violent, chasing a FedEx delivery man from the building and preventing the building’s gardener from getting inside. In one of his worst outbursts, Pea swooped down on an elderly resident and injured her hand with his talons.

The audacious peacock was also content to stand in the middle of Douglas Street, halting traffic and in one case, causing a small crash.

“He’s cased a lot of chaos, it’s been interesting to watch,” Simmons said. “He’s definitely got a reputation.”

After the attack of the resident, Victoria Animal Control Services put a band around the bird’s leg and took him to the other side of the park where the peacocks are fed. But within hours, the fearless fowl had returned with a bevy of peahens at his side.

This time Animal Control Services took him away and put him in “solitary confinement” – a temporary solution that will keep the feisty fowl from strutting back to his favourite hangout spot.

Ian Fraser, Victoria’s senior animal control officer, said the peacock’s aggressive behaviour likely has to do with mating. He speculates the bird sees his reflection in the building’s window and perceives a threat.

“He thinks that peacock is moving in on his lady friends,” Fraser said. “He likes to stay there and keep them safe.”

Fraser said the peacocks are prone to wandering, but most don’t settle down outside of the city’s parks.

“Every spring we get complaints about peacocks, they wander out of the park and wander far and wide … usually, they don’t take up residence.”

READ ALSO: Victoria closes streets near Beacon Hill Park, Dallas Road to encourage social distancing

‘Pea’ the peacock had no shortage of admirers during his time living outside a Beacon Hill apartment building. (Courtesy of Susan Simmons)


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
nina.grossman@blackpress.ca Follow us on Instagram.
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

birds

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Morning Start: High heels were first designed for men

Your morning start for Monday, Aug. 10, 2020

QUIZ: Do you know the truth?

In what has been described as a post-truth era, how much do you know about truth and lies?

EDITORIAL: Managing wildfires

Wildfires have the potential to cause significant damage within our province

Opening night lineup for online Roots & Blues festival released

The first night of the festival on Aug. 14 will be stacked with favourites from previous years

July Kootenay real estate sales at record high

Sales and prices of Kootenay real estate on the rise

Canada to match donations to Lebanon relief

Canada is directing all of its aid for this crisis directly to humanitarian organizations, not the Lebanese government

Class resumption raises challenges for Central Okanagan schools

Education ministry directive to resume K-12 classes Sept. 8 creating many questions

Bear put down after being found on Vancouver Island kitchen counter

Bear trapped and killed near Ucluelet after repeated instances of entering sheds and homes

‘We’re glad you’re here’: Positive note left on Alberta car at Kelowna beach

‘Our hearts are full, and this restores all sorts of faith in humanity’

Kelowna RCMP search for missing teen

Reina Hodgins was last seen Aug. 9, 2020 at 12:30 p.m. at her residence

Who can dismiss the Governor General? A look at protocols and possibilities

The Governor General is appointed by the Queen, on the advice of the prime minister

Second phase of NHL draft lottery set for Monday

Each club eliminated from qualifying round has a 12.5 per cent shot at the No. 1 pick

University of Victoria, rowing coach sued over alleged ‘fat shaming’ and verbal abuse

Lawsuit says Barney Williams subjected coxswain Lily Copeland to offensive and belittling language

1 year since a B.C. teen died in a skate park, his family still waiting for charges

Carson Crimeni’s final moments were broadcast on social media

Most Read