The Shaw Communications headquarters is seen in Calgary, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018. Shaw Communications says 3,300 of its employees have decided to take a voluntary buyout package, far above the company’s original estimate of about 650. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

3,300 Shaw employees accept voluntary buyouts

Shaw Communications says 3,300 of its employees have decided to take a voluntary buyout package

Shaw Communications says 3,300 of its employees have decided to take a voluntary buyout package — far above the company’s original estimate of about 650.

The Calgary-based company says about one-quarter of its workforce will be departing over an 18-month period as part of a previously announced multi-year transformation of its business.

Among the departures will be chief financial officer Vito Culmone, will be leaving the organization May 4. He’ll be replaced by Trevor English, a 20-year employee, who has been chief strategy officer responsible for business development.

Shaw originally estimated about 10 per cent of the 6,500 eligible employees would take the voluntary buyouts, when they were announced about two weeks ago.

RELATED: Shaw offers severance packages to thousands of employees

But Shaw president Jay Mehr said Thursday in a statement that “the actual uptake falls within scenarios considered and therefore we expect the business to continue to operate in the normal course with no impact on customer experience.”

It says the company will manage the timing of the departures in an orderly fashion to minimize the impact on the business. In addition, the majority of its customer care, retail and sales employees weren’t eligible for buyouts.

Most of the voluntary departures are in areas of Shaw’s business that can be further optimized through the use of technology and a more efficient service delivery model, the company said.

As a result of the departures, Shaw will incur a $450 million restructuring charge in the second quarter of its 2018 financial year, primarily related to severance costs. Actual payments will be spread over 18 months, starting in April.

“We made the difficult but necessary decision to modernize our wireline and satellite businesses by offering a generous package to those people who helped us build Shaw and chose not to join us in this transformative period of growth,” Mr. Mehr said.

“We thank all our employees for the contributions they have made to this organization and we thank each of them for their dedication to our customers.”

Companies in this story: (TSX:SJR.B)

David Paddon, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

UPDATE: Search for missing Cranbrook woman enters third day

The search for a Cranbrook woman missing in the Jumbo Pass area is entering its third day.

Search for missing Cranbrook woman ongoing

Louise Baxter missing in Jumbo Pass area since Sunday

Services report: Tickets issued for tresspassing

Conservation Officer Service The Conservation Officer Service, in collaboration with local Natural… Continue reading

Child, 4, attacked by cougar near Fernie

The BC Conservation Officer Service said it happened while the family was fishing

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Mounties deployed to help B.C. communities affected by wildfires

RCMP officers heading to places particularly within central, northern and southern B.C.

Chinese medicine practitioner in B.C. facing historical sex assault charges

71-year old Kit Wong practiced acupuncture from his home during the time of the assaults

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

B.C. company patents Sasquatch, the country’s first homegrown hops plant

Created by Hops Connect, Sasquatch hops are being grown commercially for the first time in B.C.

Farmers ponder impact of alternatives to pesticides being banned

The nicotine-based pesticides scientists have linked to a rising number of honey bee deaths will be phased out of use in Canada over a three year period starting in 2021.

Most Read