Successful summer gives way for busy fall for Kicking Horse Culture

KHC has been receiving some great feedback from audiences about the concert series.

Now that the dust has settled on Kicking Horse Culture’s Summer Kicks lineup, Executive Director Bill Usher said he can’t be anything but pleased with how the season went.

“I was really happy with the lineup this year. It was a nice mix of stuff for all ages,” Usher said.

KHC has also been receiving some great feedback from audiences about the concert series.

“There’s this wonderful gathering of the community coming in there. That’s the constant feedback we get from people, is that they are coming now to meet their neighbours, to hang out and to enjoy the scene of it all…It was kind of a community party in a way.”

A lot has yet to be determined about what Summer Kicks will look like next year, all Usher would say is that KHC has a few things in the works that could give the concert series a different, even better look to it.

In the meantime, the Live Kicks schedule has been announced for the fall and winter season and Usher is also happy with how that has come together, saying the lineup has a good mix of artists and bands.

In addition to Brickhouse, who are scheduled to perform on Sept. 20, Usher highlighted Front Porch Roots Revue and 605 Collective’s New Animal as fall shows to look forward to.

Front Porch Roots Revue will present Up on Cripple Creek: Song Book of the Band on Oct. 10. Their show captivates then and now with the soulful reveries and bottom-heavy blues that distinguished The Band’s rustic rock. Usher was quick to point out that this isn’t your typical tribute band.

“For those of us who know [The Band’s] repertoire, you are going to hear songs that you’ve heard all your life, but you’re going to hear them re-interpreted by this really good, almost like an all-star, band from Alberta,” he said.

605 Collective’s New Animal offers a ferocious exchange between urban and contemporary distance and their choreography can best be described as “urban jungle”, or primal movement with a hip contemporary edge. The show will be on Oct. 25, and from Oct. 22-24 the group will run a series of dance classes for locals in town.

“That’s going to be a very cool opportunity, especially for young people..to work with six dancers that are just at the top of their game,” Usher said.

KHC has hundreds of members signed up for the upcoming season. Memberships cost $10 for the season and members get a chance to buy one of 75 early-bird tickets for $15 for any given show. Regular advance tickets for members cost $20, with everyone paying $25 at the door. For more information on the fall and winter lineup, visit www.kickinghorseculture.ca or log on to the Kicking Horse Culture Facebook page.

 

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