Let’s do Lunch: The Power of a Photograph

The Kicking Horse Country Chamber of Commerce’s (KHCCC) Let’s do Lunch workshops have covered everything from business branding to the new world of social media in the past few months.

Dibble Photography specializes in wedding photography

Dibble Photography specializes in wedding photography

The Kicking Horse Country Chamber of Commerce’s (KHCCC) Let’s do Lunch workshops have covered everything from business branding to the new world of social media in the past few months.

KHCCC’s next workshop, The Power of a Photograph will focus on just that—how just a few, powerful images can impress the eye of a customer and help both your brand and your business.

The workshop will take place at the Island Restaurant from noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, May 18th.

Local professional photographer Claire Dibble will be hosting the workshop. Dibble started her business, Dibble Photography, in 2009 and has been building a base of customers ever since. She specializes in wedding photography, portraits, and commercial photography.

“Both my parents were interested in photography, so I was encouraged even at a young age,” said Dibble of how she got into photography. “I remember just how excited I was when I got my first point and shoot.”

Although she has taken a few photography courses and completed an internship at the Banff Centre, Dibble claims to be mostly self-taught. Since starting her own business, she has been increasingly interested in other small businesses in Golden and what makes them tick.

Wednesday’s workshop will explore—among other topics— the impact of advertising photography, the importance of intention, options of acquiring images, technical tips for shooting and processing, how and where to use photographs and what makes a “good photograph”.

So what does make a good photograph?

“It’s very subject to personal taste,” said Dibble. “It’s about determining who you want to reach and what will appeal to them.”

On a more technical scale, ensuring images are properly exposed and the colours balanced is important for producing quality photographs.

A “less professional” photo might be lacking in a clear subject, or out of focus just a bit — enough to make you notice but not so much that it was an intentional, artistic choice.

Dibble explained that it’s a photograph’s subject and composition that help deliver a clear message.

She believes that the impact of a truly great photo is hard to parallel with other forms of communication. Dibble encourages anyone interested in marketing their product or service to join Wednesday’s Let’s do Lunch workshop and emphasized that with today’s technology, you don’t need thousands of dollars worth of equipment to take high-quality photographs.

“You can even do it on your phone,” Dibble finished.

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