Jan. 31 is the most common day to quit your job. (Flickr/Apopix)

Jan. 31 is the most common day to quit your job

UK studies point to the end of January as the most common day for employees to pack it in

If you’ve been considering quitting your job, today could be the day, at least that’s what statistics from the United Kingdom propose.

According to a survey by Glassdoor, January is the month most likely to see job changes, while other UK reports note Jan. 31 is the most likely day for people to quit their jobs.

This can be because the new year brings a sense of change; top that with dreary weather, compounding holiday debt and a desire to fulfill an ambitious new year’s resolution and it’s the perfect recipe for resignation.

ALSO READ: Edmonton woman quits Claire’s after refusing to pierce tearful seven-year-old’s ears

According to the report, the most motivating factors to quit include having a low salary, a bad relationship with a boss or colleagues, a lack of career progression, work stress and lengthy commute times.

Anyone who doesn’t bite the bullet today might be amused by another UK statistic. On the first Monday in February people are likely to call in sick to attend interviews.

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca

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