Researcher and activist Sadie Parr poses with two Robert Bateman prints. The prints

Famous artist contributes to Golden researcher’s project

A local wolf activist has gotten some help from an internationally renowned artist to continue her research project.

A local wolf activist has gotten some help from an internationally renowned artist to continue her research project.

Sadie Parr has combined an interest in wolves, science, conservation and wildlife artwork for a fundraiser to help advance her continuing wolf research and outreach project in B.C.’s Chilcotin region.

Canadian wildlife artist Robert Bateman has donated five limited edition prints of wolves, each of which has also been signed by the artist.

Bateman is not only an internationally know painter, but also an avid conservationist.

The prints will be on sale, with the proceeds helping Parr cover the expenses associated with her research.

“I am extremely thankful for the support of Mr. Bateman, and all the people who participate in the fundraiser,” said Parr.

“These amazing pieces of artwork capture the magic and movement of each wolf portrayed.”

Two prints; New Territory (34 by 23 inches) and Catching the Scent (14 by 11 inches), are ready for sale now. More information can be found at www.justbeings.com.

Parr does conservation outreach through her organization “JustBeings”, to help her fundraising efforts for the Chilcotin wolf project.  She has started this project in partnership with the Valhalla Wilderness Society, Friends of Nemaiah Valley, and Xeni Gwet’in community of the Tsilhqot’in First Nation.

Fieldwork will continue this winter and over the next two years, and travel for each trip is costly, as Parr continues to live in Golden.

Funds also need to be raised to analyze samples of hair and scat that Parr is collecting to help detect and understand the feeding ecology of wolves in the biologically rich ecosystems of the Nemaiah Valley and Brittany Triangle.

These places are also home to wild horses and are located within the Chilcotin region, southwest of Williams Lake.

The results of the study will be used to facilitate a better coexistence among wildlife and humans.

Parr has long been an activist for the plight of wolves, and has also been advocating on a provincial level recently. She has been meeting with Columbia River Revelstoke MLA Norm Macdonald to discuss the province’s proposed new Wolf Management Plan, a plan she calls “a step backwards for people and wolves.”